20% OFF ALL METAL PRINTS! Its The "Dog Days Of Summer" Sale At John Morey Photography

July 15, 2015  •  Leave a Comment

20% OFF ALL Metal Prints! Its The "Dog Days Of Summer" Sale At John Morey Photography

 

This is the sultry part of the Summer marked by lethargy, inactivity, or indolence – otherwise known as “The Dog Days Of Summer”. If you have seen something of mine you love and just never pulled the trigger, then DEFY YOUR DOLDRUMS and take advantage of this discount at John Morey Photography! – STARTING Monday, July 13th through Friday, July 17. Enter coupon code “METAL20” during checkout to receive discount on all images of mine you love.

Dawn's Celestial MelodyDawn's Celestial Melody"And even the sun in dawn chorus sings, a celestial melody to the earth below." ~ Tjaden. Sunrise near the base of Mt. Banner at Thousand Island Lake, in the Ansel Adams Wilderness

These images are printed on High Definition Aluminum Art panels. This gives you a modern way to display your imagery.  The .045" thick aluminum photo panels have rounded corners and are coated with a high gloss finish.  Each panel includes a hanging wall mount on the back of the print to allow it to offset from your walls with a half-inch float, for a super clean and stylistic look, perfect for updating your home decor. I currently offer Aluminum Panels with two different base colors: White & Clear.  For the most accurate and vibrant color representation, choose a white base. If one desires more of a "Metal Effect" with a metallic reflection accenting the artwork, then choose the clear base. Both are amazing and provide uniqueness to the artwork you want to display.

SIZE Regular Price 20% OFF Sale Price
8x10 $60 $48
10x20 $105 $84
11x14 $90 $72
12x12 $70 $56
12x18 $105 $84
16x20 $140 $112
16x24 $185 $148
20x30 $260 $208
24x36 $350 $280


Ready to start shopping? Simply go to http://johnmoreyphotography.com/ and browse around, or use my site’s search function with some key words describing what you are looking for. Or browse through any of my images here on Facebook, http://facebook.com/JohnMoreyPhotography, where you will find the direct link to the image on my site. Apologies For Cathedral’s BrideApologies For Cathedral’s BridePhotographed in California, of Yosemite National Park’s Bridalveil Falls flowing out of Cathedral Rock and Spires. After getting through the worst of storm, I finally started descending into Yosemite Valley for the first time ever visiting this place. Often the first waterfall seen by visitors to Yosemite Valley, and quite iconic and heavily photographed, I hoped for something special to set my imagery apart from the gluttony of other images that exist of this scene, and with insane fortune my immediate vision of the valley was met with this apology for my trouble. Navajo Falls FlowNavajo Falls FlowIn the Havasupai Nation of the Grand Canyon, between the village of Supai and the Havasupai campgrounds, you start to get some of the first good looks at Havasu Creek. One such view not as well photographed as the more grand Havasu Falls and Mooney Falls further downstream, is Navajo Falls.

Upper and Lower Navajo Falls came into being in 2008 when the flood of that year moved massive amounts of rock and mud gouging out a deep bed. The old Navajo Falls was bypassed in the process leaving it dry.

New Navajo Falls has one of the same characteristics of its old namesake; the creek erupts out of dense vegetation in many different streams to fall about 50' into the pool. This is how the old Navajo Falls behaved at times shifting a lot of its flow through the trees and shrubs to tumble down the rocks in various places across the face of the cliff. The Lower Navajo Falls, also known as Rock Falls, is about 30' high and nearly 100' wide and has a nice swimming hole.
Autumn On Havasu CreekAutumn On Havasu CreekYes, the water in Havasu Creek, located in the Havasupai Native American reservation in the Western end of the Grand Canyon, is actually this color blue. Havasupai translated means “land of the blue-green water” and the creek is well known for this color and distinctive travertine formations. This is due to large amounts of calcium carbonate in the water that formed the limestone that lines the creek and reflects its color so strongly. This also gives the creek an interesting feature as it is ever changing. This occurs because any items that fall into the stream mineralize very quickly, causing new formations and changing the flow of the water. This causes the creek to never look the same from one year to another. The creek runs through the village of Supai, and it ultimately flows into the Colorado River.


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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