MY BAD NEWS IS YOUR GAIN - Pending Price Increase - ALL METAL PRINTS 10% off old prices

June 01, 2015  •  Leave a Comment

MY BAD NEWS IS YOUR GAIN - Pending Price Increase - ALL METAL PRINTS 10% off old prices

It’s the “MY BAD NEWS IS YOUR GAIN SALE!” Effective 6/4/15, my current metal print vendor, that I use for my very popular 24”x36” and smaller gift-size Metal Prints, are raising their costs on all my items, ranging from 2% to 31% increases, with some of my popular sizes taking the biggest hits.  I have to admit this really messes with my strategic price point strategies that have proven successful, and I may have to shop some new vendors…but in the meantime I will move forward with the increases and adjust all my pricing accordingly.  Here is your very limited window to not only acquire my metal prints at their old prices before the prices increase, but to sweeten the deal I will throw AN ADDITIONAL 10% off!!!. IF you have seen something of mine you have been wanting AND putting off, maybe it is time to pull that trigger NOW – ESPECIALLY WITH FATHER’S DAY coming soon if you need a gift to give.  Here is the old, new, and the 10% off sale pricing.  Message me with interest. Sale expires 11:59pm PST, June 3rd, 2015.

                              Item        Old           New        10%-Off-Old thru 6/3/15
8"x10"      $52.00      $60.00      $46.80
11"x14"    $79.00      $90.00      $71.10
12"x12"    $61.00      $70.00      $54.90
12"x18"    $88.00      $105.00    $79.20
10"x20"    $81.00      $105.00    $72.90
16"x20"    $135.00    $140.00    $121.50
16"x24"    $171.00    $185.00    $153.90
20"x30"    $237.00    $265.00    $213.30
24"x30"    $273.00    $280.00    $245.70
24"x36"    $338.00    $360.00    $304.20

 

Apologies For Cathedral’s BrideApologies For Cathedral’s BridePhotographed in California, of Yosemite National Park’s Bridalveil Falls flowing out of Cathedral Rock and Spires. After getting through the worst of storm, I finally started descending into Yosemite Valley for the first time ever visiting this place. Often the first waterfall seen by visitors to Yosemite Valley, and quite iconic and heavily photographed, I hoped for something special to set my imagery apart from the gluttony of other images that exist of this scene, and with insane fortune my immediate vision of the valley was met with this apology for my trouble. No Starting Point Or DestinationNo Starting Point Or Destination"Man sees the morning as the beginning of a new day; he takes germination as the start in the life of a plant, and withering as its end. But this is nothing more than biased judgment on his part. Nature is one. There is no starting point or destination, only an unending flux, a continuous metamorphosis of all things." ~ Masanobu Fukuoka

There comes a time when every nature photographer stops the chase and knows it is time for nature to come to him -- whether it is fatigue or wisdom, I can't say. I spent the morning furiously hiking this way and that, intense towards capturing the best imagery and light possible; as if every changing moment might be the last without knowing what is just around the next bend in the trail. How many times have I passed by the best thinking there would be better, only to have squandered it? Oh that reckless pursuit in search of something better, will it ever end? I stopped and I knew. This was it, and I shall wait. Without knowing what is around the bend, I shall wait -- There is no starting point or destination, just the here and now of perfection.
Grand Sky Of Soul's InteriorGrand Sky Of Soul's Interior“There is one spectacle grander than the sea, that is the sky; there is one spectacle grander than the sky, that is the interior of the soul” ~ Victor Hugo

When one travels and tours Upper Antelope Canyon, outside of Page, Arizona, the typical experience is one of rushed compositions and feelings of frustration. As clamoring guides jockey against each other trying to rush their groups from one chamber in the slot canyon to the next one, for one staged shot after another of tricked out sun-beams and sand-falls, the constant melee of other photographers and tourists with their smart phones reactively photographing whatever their guide points them at tends to bleed the interior of the soul’s experience here.

So it was with rare glee that my mind’s soulful eye looked forward to this unique experience of being able to photograph the canyon against the night’s starry sky, and to tour its sandstone shadows in peace and self-paced discovery. Alone except for the knowledge and expertise of the guide with me, I completed my evening with this final satisfying image of the grand sky outside, as if looking out from my soul’s interior.
The Attraction Of WaterThe Attraction Of Water"Water, whether still or in motion, has so great an attraction for the lover of nature, that the most beautiful landscape seems scarcely complete without it. There are no effects so fascinating as those produced by the reflections in nature’s living mirror, with their delicacy of form, ever fleeting and changing, and their subtle combinations of colour." ~ Montagu Pollock

Photographed at "The Subway" feature of the Left Fork trail of the North River, Zion National Park. With no direct light to affect the scene, the slight orange reflections of sunlight on distant sandstone outside of view are being reflected on the flow of the cool water over each little fall. Meanwhile, yellow Autumn leaves pepper the slick rock to add to the balance.
Surrounding AtmosphereSurrounding Atmosphere“For me, a landscape does not exist in its own right, since its appearance changes at every moment; but the surrounding atmosphere brings it to life - the light and the air which vary continually. For me, it is only the surrounding atmosphere which gives subjects their true value.” ~ Claude Monet

It had been a long time goal to visit Hunt's Mesa, in Monument Valley. Normally a place with an excessive amount of clear blue skies and sunny days, I knew and I hoped that my visit in June would depend on a different surrounding atmosphere to produce what I imagined. With unimaginable luck, the sky, the light, and air all cooperated beyond my imagination, for both sunset and sunrise. Here is sunrise-muted light breaking through the clouds to produce this magical landscape, a short distance from my tent.
Hold Your DestinyHold Your Destiny“It is not in the stars to hold our destiny but in ourselves.” ~ William Shakespeare

Just outside Beatty, Nevada, between it and the Northern section of Death Valley, I spent two evenings at a famous ghost town, by the name of Rhyolite. Pictured here are the ruins of the Cook Bank building, with the starry sky in the background. While photographing this and spending my evenings in Rhyolite, I often thought about how the residents here over 100 years ago must have felt when the town was at its peak; as if their immediate destinies seemed rich with only the sky as the limit. And then in just a few short years to realize that their destiny was not placed in themselves, but instead controlled by things much more out of their control – almost like realizing their destiny was held in the stars, rather than in themselves. I also often thought about how life repeats itself and wondered why we as humans give our power away, and so often allow our destinies to be controlled by something other than ourselves. Is there a microcosmic lesson in humanity here I wondered?

Rhyolite is a ghost town in Nevada. It is in the Bullfrog Hills, about 120 miles (190 km) northwest of Las Vegas, near the eastern edge of Death Valley. The town began in early 1905 as one of several mining camps that sprang up after a prospecting discovery in the surrounding hills. During an ensuing gold rush, thousands of gold-seekers, developers, miners and service providers flocked to the Bullfrog Mining District – Many settled in Rhyolite. Industrialist Charles M. Schwab (Does the name sound familiar?) bought the Montgomery Shoshone Mine in 1906 and invested heavily in infrastructure, including piped water, electric lines and railroad transportation, that served the town as well as the mine. By 1907, Rhyolite had electric lights, water mains, telephones, newspapers, a hospital, a school, an opera house, and even a stock exchange! Published estimates of the town's peak population vary widely, but scholarly sources generally place it in a range between 3,500 and 5,000 in 1907–08.

Rhyolite declined almost as rapidly as it rose. After the richest ore was exhausted, production fell. Also, the 1906 San Francisco earthquake and the financial panic of 1907 made it more difficult to raise development capital. Then in 1908, investors in the mining operation, concerned that it was overvalued, ordered an independent study. When the study's findings proved unfavorable, the mining company's stock value crashed, further restricting funding. By the end of 1910, the mine was operating at a loss, and it closed in 1911. By this time, many out-of-work miners had moved elsewhere, and Rhyolite's population dropped well below 1,000. By 1920, it was close to zero. After 1920, Rhyolite and its ruins became a tourist attraction and a setting for motion pictures. Most of its buildings crumbled, were salvaged for building materials, or were moved to nearby Beatty or other towns, although the railway depot and a house made chiefly of empty bottles were repaired and preserved.
Autumn On Havasu CreekAutumn On Havasu CreekYes, the water in Havasu Creek, located in the Havasupai Native American reservation in the Western end of the Grand Canyon, is actually this color blue. Havasupai translated means “land of the blue-green water” and the creek is well known for this color and distinctive travertine formations. This is due to large amounts of calcium carbonate in the water that formed the limestone that lines the creek and reflects its color so strongly. This also gives the creek an interesting feature as it is ever changing. This occurs because any items that fall into the stream mineralize very quickly, causing new formations and changing the flow of the water. This causes the creek to never look the same from one year to another. The creek runs through the village of Supai, and it ultimately flows into the Colorado River.


 

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