Publishing Announcement: "Boots & Burgers: An Arizona Handbook For Hungry Hikers"

November 04, 2014  •  1 Comment

Publishing Announcement: "Boots & Burgers: An Arizona Handbook For Hungry Hikers"

Here is the latest book I am pleased to have my imagery published in, written by my friend and great writer, Roger Naylor, and published by Rio Nuevo Publishers of Tucson. "Boots & Burgers: An Arizona Handbook for Hungry Hikers" was released Oct. 24 and is available in stores across the state and on Amazon. According to Roger:

"This is my dream book, one I've had in my head for years. It's actually a love letter to Arizona, disguised as a hiking and dining guide. Here's the idea: Spend a morning hiking miles on a beautiful trail, and then grab a juicy burger. That's my favorite day of all. I'll take that day anytime I can get it. Beyond trail descriptions and restaurant info, I provide suggestions for attractions and activities. I add historic tidbits, rambling thoughts and big dollops of quirkiness. Most of all, the book is packed with great days. Peel off some for yourself. Lace up the boots and explore the scenic wonders of this epic landscape. Then unwind in a comfortable hideout, where burgers leap off the grill like trout from a stream."
 
As a teaser to get you started with the book, the following 16 images (except cover) produced by me are images included in the book, with myself being the single largest contributor. With most every one of them I have reproduced Roger's words from the book, so you can get a sense of the content.  To whet your appetite, maybe some words from the Forward of his book will get you lacing up the boots.
 
 
 
"HERE'S THE SCENARIO: I roll out of bed and point my truck toward a trail. I hike into the Arizona outback under a high arched sky with a lingering hint of moonlight. Dawn wounds the eastern horizon as coyote yips recede in the distance.

I walk for miles. I wander lonesome lands - a maze of canyons, a canopied forest or a snarl of desert - it doesn't matter. I adore every square inch of this heart-wringing, soul-squeezing state. The silence soothes me. Wildlife swoops and scampers at the edge of my vision. The lustrous light of morning sharpens to a hard glare. The twisted trail pulls me deeper into wilderness as wildflowers perfume a subtle breeze. Past noon the sun turns squinty-eyed mean. The heat begins to stalk me with a knife in its teeth. I walk for miles.

On the drive home I stop at dinner or cafe, a casual joint where no one bats an eye at my dusty boots and sweat-streaked shirt. The waitress calls me "Hon" and hustles out my drinks. I don't need a menu because I know exactly what I want. I chug ice water and my stomach rumbles until my burger arrives. I bite into the grill-kissed slab of beef.

Right there, that's my favorite day of all. That's Halloween, Christmas, and the spring equinox rolled into one. Walk off a few calories and then pack them on again. I admire the Zen-like simplicity of it. I'll take a boots and burgers day anytime I can get it."
 ~ Source: Roger Naylor "Boots & Burgers: An Arizona Handbook For Hungry Hikers"
 
For those who would like to buy the book, it was just released a week ago, and can be purchased on Amazon at:
 
In addition, Roger will be doing a book signing at Changing Hands Bookstore of Tempe, on Friday night @ 7pm, November 14th. I will be there, so if you would like to buy a copy there, and/or join me, please feel free ;-)
 
Other book signings around the state in the near future are:
* Well Red Coyote in Sedona on Sat. Nov. 15 at 2pm
* Burning Tree Cellars in Old Town Cottonwood on Wed. Nov. 19 at 6pm
 
Kachina Trail First Snow
 
"This high country ramble delivers a big mountain experience without any real climbing, bless its woodsy heart. Kachina follows a gently rolling course across the midsection of the San Francisco Peaks. It passes through conifer groves and huddles aspens framed by slanted meadows filled with waist-high bracken ferns. The trail stretches five miles, descending 700 feet from the upper end at 9,500 feet to its terminus in the mouth of Weatherford Canyon. Limber pine and Douglas fir dominate old growth forests at the highest elevations. As the trail drops to the South facing slopes of Agassiz and Fremont peaks, our old friends the ponderosa pines rise up in welcome.
 
Although popular, the trail seldom feels over-run. Everyone seems to find a comfortable pace and strings out among the trees. As a card-carrying curmudgeon, I tend to steer clear of crowds but have never gotten cranky on Kachina. Clusters of andesite boulders, remnants of an ancient lava flow, are scattered through the timber. Such a peaceful landscape, it’s hard to believe it was born of fire. The river of lava that once scoured these slopes has been embraced by the forest, which seems to bear no grudge. Big boulders are sprinkled with soil, leaves, and debris, and trees grow from their very pores." ~ Source: Roger Naylor "Boots & Burgers: An Arizona Handbook For Hungry Hikers"

Autumn On The Kachina TrailAutumn On The Kachina Trail

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Autumn On The Kachina Trail
 
"This high country ramble delivers a big mountain experience without any real climbing, bless its woodsy heart. Kachina follows a gently rolling course across the midsection of the San Francisco Peaks. It passes through conifer groves an huddles aspens framed by slanted meadows filled with waist-high bracken ferns. The trail stretches five miles, descending 700 feet from the upper end at 9,500 feet to its terminus in the mouth of Weatherford Canyon. Limber pine and Douglas fir dominate old growth forests at the highest elevations. As the trail drops to the South facing slopes of Agassiz and Fremont peaks, our old friends the ponderosa pines rise up in welcome.
 
Dipping in and out of shallow drainages and skirting small cliffs, I wind around the rising bulk of the peaks. On the second half of the hike, the pastures widen exposing lovely views of mountaintops above and towns, buttes, and hills far below. When the Kachina junctions with the Weatherford Trail, about-face it and return to your car. This is one of those ideal hikes where you’ll enjoy the going as much as the coming." ~ Source: Roger Naylor "Boots & Burgers: An Arizona Handbook For Hungry Hikers"
 
 
 
 
Mama Burger
 
"If you love burgers, it’s probably because of Mama Burger or a place just like it. Before fast-food joints corrupted the process, this was how we got our burger fix: someone in an apron tossing a ball of fresh meat onto the flattop. There’s still magic in the simplicity of it. Burgers are made with pure Angus chuck and pressed once with a steak weight as they sizzle on the griddle. The process creates a tin rough-hewn patty boasting a delicate crispness around the edges but sacrificing nothing in the juicy department. Swabbed with house-made Thousand Island and stacked with fresh produce, these sender beauties are the Flagstaff version of In-N-Out. Of course, I opt for mustard instead of the sauce. Salad dressing and burgers don’t mix as far as I’m concerned.
 
The sinfully addictive fresh-cut fries are among the best in the state, radiant with zesty spud flavor. They start the morning as potatoes and are hand cut and cooked in zero-trans-fat oil, seasoned, and served piping hot. You can even have the served atop your burger. If all mamas tried that, nobody would ever leave home." ~ Source: Roger Naylor "Boots & Burgers: An Arizona Handbook For Hungry Hikers"
 
991 N. Fort Valley Road, (928) 226-0616 www.themamaburger.com
 

Autumn At Veit SpringsAutumn At Veit Springs

 

Autumn At Veit Springs

 
"Veit Springs is my oldest Arizona friend. It’s the first trail I ever hiked in the state. As a freshman at NAU, I was on my way to English class one exquisite October morning when I glanced toward the San Francisco Peaks banded with yellow. Suddenly, nothing else mattered. Not Twain, not Faulkner, not even Kerouac. The aspens had turned. I rounded up two like-minded scofflaws and we headed for Veit Springs, a short loop curling through lavish groves of the white-trunked trees and their vibrant canopy of heart-shaped leaves. Past a historic cabin and gurgling springs, at the foot of a basalt cliff adorned with pictographs, sits a field of sprawl-friendly boulders. For the rest of the afternoon, we lay draped atop the rocks like we had been poured there. Shafts of sunlight streamed through the rustling patchwork of lemon and saffron above us, and every breeze triggered the soft fireworks of fluttering golden leaves.
 
The trail begins as a gentle climb along an old Jeep road to a small preserve. This 160-acre tract was homesteaded in 1892 by Ludwig Veit. It’s now managed by the Arizona Game and Fish Department and is known as the Lamar Haines Memorial Wildlife Area. Elk and deer are common sights mornings and evenings. The road soon narrows to a path and reaches a fork at 0.2 miles. Take the loop clockwise. Just before reaching a plague honoring Haines, a Flagstaff educator and environmentalist, a spur trail leads to the tumbledown remains of Veit’s cabin and two small springhouses. Veit Springs makes a great kid-friendly hike with easy walking and plenty of nooks and crannies. Follow the cliff around to the left to discover a few red-orange pictographs, estimated to be more than a thousand years old. Just below the rock art, a collection of big, comfortable boulders are spread among the aspens. Hooky recliners, I call them. If you see a middle-aged guy with a loopy grin stretched out atop a rock, pay him no mind. He might be a travel writer hard at work." ~ Source: Roger Naylor "Boots & Burgers: An Arizona Handbook for Hungry Hikers"
 
 
Veit Springs Rock Art
 
"Veit Springs is my oldest Arizona friend. It’s the first trail I ever hiked in the state. As a freshman at NAU, I was on my way to English class one exquisite October morning when I glanced toward the San Francisco Peaks banded with yellow. Suddenly, nothing else mattered. Not Twain, not Faulkner, not even Kerouac. The aspens had turned. I rounded up two like-minded scofflaws and we headed for Veit Springs, a short loop curling through lavish groves of the white-trunked trees and their vibrant canopy of heart-shaped leaves. Past a historic cabin and gurgling springs, at the foot of a basalt cliff adorned with pictographs, sits a field of sprawl-friendly boulders. For the rest of the afternoon, we lay draped atop the rocks like we had been poured there. Shafts of sunlight streamed through the rustling patchwork of lemon and saffron above us, and every breeze triggered the soft fireworks of fluttering golden leaves.
 
The trail begins as a gentle climb along an old Jeep road to a small preserve. This 160-acre tract was homesteaded in 1892 by Ludwig Veit. It’s now managed by the Arizona Game and Fish Department and is known as the Lamar Haines Memorial Wildlife Area. Elk and deer are common sights mornings and evenings. The road soon narrows to a path and reaches a fork at 0.2 miles. Take the loop clockwise. Just before reaching a plague honoring Haines, a Flagstaff educator and environmentalist, a spur trail leads to the tumbledown remains of Veit’s cabin and two small springhouses. Veit Springs makes a great kid-friendly hike with easy walking and plenty of nooks and crannies. Follow the cliff around to the left to discover a few red-orange pictographs, estimated to be more than a thousand years old. Just below the rock art, a collection of big, comfortable boulders are spread among the aspens. Hooky recliners, I call them. If you see a middle-aged guy with a loopy grin stretched out atop a rock, pay him no mind. He might be a travel writer hard at work." ~ Source: Roger Naylor "Boots & Burgers: An Arizona Handbook for Hungry Hikers"
 
 
Diablo Burger
 
"Before you bite into one of the delectable slabs of beef at Diablo Burger, you’re probably thinking, Why is it cradled on an English muffin? After much experimentation, DB decided the light, crisp muffin makes the perfect wrapping for the burger. With meat this fresh and tender, you want just the right framework. All burgers are made using open-range, antibiotic-free beef from Diablo Trust ranches, operating Southeast of Flagstaff. This arrangement supports the stewardship of nearly a half million acres of a local ecosystem.
 
Since the beef is about 95 percent lean, try it medium-rare. This is an excellent burger, but as a traditionalist I do not graciously embrace change. On the standard burger, I’m slightly distracted by the muffin. But it probably works better with more complex creations. And here’s a tip: Put the lettuce between the tomato and top of the English muffin. That keeps the moisture of the tomato from turning the muffin soggy. They serve fries, or Belgian-style fries, fresh cut, cooked twice in peanut oil and served with a dash of rosemary. Delicious!" ~ Source: Roger Naylor "Boots & Burgers: An Arizona Handbook For Hungry Hikers"
 
120 N. Leroux St. Flagstaff. (928) 774-3274 www.diabloburger.com
 
 
Red Mountain Trail
 
"I love the fantasy-land aspect of Red Mountain and the suddenly jangly weirdness of it. The short, easy trail travels through scenic wood-lands before plunging into the mystical gullet of a volcano. Red Mountain is one of the several hundred cinder cones that poke through every pore in the volcanic landscape surrounding Flagstaff. But unlike most symmetrical cones, Red Mountain is a haphazard U-shape, with an amphitheater carved from the Northeast flank. “Carved” may mislead; it looks like some giant cosmic being took a chomp, leaving behind a raggedy assortment of hoodoos and a labyrinth of slender canyons.
 
The trail starts on a wide path rising gently though a forest of junipers and pinon pines. Dipping into a sandy wash it continues toward the base of Red Mountain, with towers 1,000 feet overhead. So far everything seems normal, but a mile from the trail-head, things take a turn for the freaky. Walls of black cinder rise up, flanking the stream-bed with a few lonely ponderosa pines growing from the desolation. The trail squeezes between dark towers of volcanic tuff (ash that’s been cemented by the ages). A six-foot ladder climbs over a stone wall, and suddenly you’re engulfed in an arena of gnawed spires, twisted pillars, and hard-edged badlands. The reds of Red Mountain are not the saucy, seductive hues of Sedona or Monument Valley. They’re more earthy tones, leaning in an orangish direction." ~ Source: Roger Naylor "Boots & Burgers: An Arizona Handbook For Hungry Hikers"
 

Red Mountain SunriseRed Mountain Sunrise

 
Red Mountain Sunrise
 
"I love the fantasy-land aspect of Red Mountain and the suddenly jangly weirdness of it. The short, easy trail travels through scenic wood-lands before plunging into the mystical gullet of a volcano. Red Mountain is one of the several hundred cinder cones that poke through every pore in the volcanic landscape surrounding Flagstaff. But unlike most symmetrical cones, Red Mountain is a haphazard U-shape, with an amphitheater carved from the Northeast flank. “Carved” may mislead; it looks like some giant cosmic being took a chomp, leaving behind a raggedy assortment of hoodoos and a labyrinth of slender canyons.
 
The inner basin spread out among clustered hoodoos that beg for a little exploration. The surface makes for great grippy bouldering. It’s like a hobbit-sized Bryce Canyon, vivid and endlessly entertaining. So yank the kids out of the ball pit at McDonald’s and let them discover a natural playground." ~ Source: Roger Naylor "Boots & Burgers: An Arizona Handbook For Hungry Hikers"
 
 
Aspens At Widforss Trail-head
 
"Not every trail at the canyon is a grueling death march. The Widforss, for example, never dips below the rim. Named for Gunnar Widforss, and artist who painted western national parks in the 1920s and 1930s, the trail rambles through shaggy woods, offering big canyon panoramas on the way. Near the trailhead, grab a brochure from the metal box. The guide matches up with numbered markers scattered long the first 2.5 miles of the hike identifying points of interest. Much of this segment traces the edge of the gorge, so you’ll enjoy impressive viewpoints. The final marker is one such overlook. You can head back after that for a nice 5-miler. If you continue, the trail turns into the forest, cutting through a picturesque little vally where I had my lupine epiphany. Even though it was early in the monsoon season, blooms were splashed across the forest floor. I spotted fleabane, paintbrush, fireweed, and several others I couldn’t readily identify.
 
On approach to Widforss Point, a picnic table sits in the shade of a big ponderosa pine. It has to be the most superfluous picnic table in the park. Who’s going to drive to the North Rim, hike five miles into the woods, then stop a few feet from the rim – where there are no canyon vistas – to have a picnic? My suggestion is to continue walking the additional fifty yards to Widforss Point. There you can find a nice sitting rock with terrific views and have yourself a proper canyon-side repast. Remember: friends don’t let friends picnic irresponsibly." ~ Source: Roger Naylor "Boots & Burgers: An Arizona Handbook For Hungry Hikers.
 

Widforss Autumn SunsetWidforss Autumn Sunset

 
Widforss Autumn Sunset
 
"Not every trail at the canyon is a grueling death march. The Widforss, for example, never dips below the rim. Named for Gunnar Widforss, and artist who painted western national parks in the 1920s and 1930s, the trail rambles through shaggy woods, offering big canyon panoramas on the way. Near the trailhead, grab a brochure from the metal box. The guide matches up with numbered markers scattered long the first 2.5 miles of the hike identifying points of interest. Much of this segment traces the edge of the gorge, so you’ll enjoy impressive viewpoints. The final marker is one such overlook. You can head back after that for a nice 5-miler. If you continue, the trail turns into the forest, cutting through a picturesque little vally where I had my lupine epiphany. Even though it was early in the monsoon season, blooms were splashed across the forest floor. I spotted fleabane, paintbrush, fireweed, and several others I couldn’t readily identify.
 
On approach to Widforss Point, a picnic table sits in the shade of a big ponderosa pine. It has to be the most superfluous picnic table in the park. Who’s going to drive to the North Rim, hike five miles into the woods, then stop a few feet from the rim – where there are no canyon vistas – to have a picnic? My suggestion is to continue walking the additional fifty yards to Widforss Point. There you can find a nice sitting rock with terrific views and have yourself a proper canyon-side repast. Remember: friends don’t let friends picnic irresponsibly." ~ Source: Roger Naylor "Boots & Burgers: An Arizona Handbook For Hungry Hikers
 
 
Lees Ferry Lodge At Vermilion Cliffs
 
"This rustic inn sits on one of the loneliest and most scenic highways in Arizona, just South of the Utah state line. Tucked against the ferocious escarpment of towering rock walls, Lees Ferry Lodge offers motel rooms, a restaurant, and bar with a an amazing beer selection. I can’t vouch for the rooms because I haven’t spent the night but I can never drive by without grabbing a bite and a brew and to relax for awhile on one of my favorite porches in the world. The Vermilion Cliffs rise 3,000 feet above the plateau, a geological upheaval that appears as an endless line of lofty buttes and mesas. Carved by eons of erosion to expose a bouquet of colorful strata, the cliffs provide your meal with an unforgettable backdrop. You can’t go wrong with ribs, steaks, the delicious smoked trout platter, or big ol’ burger. But it’s the porch I love most. Sitting there on a June evening as the twilight unpeels the afternoon heat and the sky spins through a color wheel – red, then orange, then melting into a molten puddle of gold – is the ideal way to kiss Summer full on the lips." ~ Source: Roger Naylor "Boots & Burgers: An Arizona Handbook For Hungry Hikers"
 
Milepost 541.5 Arizona 89A, (928) 355-2231. www.vermilioncliffs.com
 
Rooted In Strength And BeautyRooted In Strength And Beauty
 
Rooted In Strength And Beauty
 
"Consider a tree for a moment. As beautiful as trees are to look at, we don't see what goes on underground - as they grow roots. Trees must develop deep roots in order to grow strong and produce their beauty. But we don't see the roots. We just see and enjoy the beauty. In much the same way, what goes on inside of us is like the roots of a tree." ~ Joyce Meyer
 
Big-tooth Maple tree, along Horton Creek, in Arizona's Tonto National Forest, near Payson, While taking a rest and laying under this strong and beautiful Maple, I appreciated not just what was visible, but also what was hidden beneath the Earth that fortifies the character above -- and secretly hoped the roots of my own character would support me so well through the seasons.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Seductive Call Of A CascadeThe Seductive Call Of A Cascade

The Seductive Call Of A Cascade
 
"Being a waterway in Arizona is often a seasonal job. "Some creeks run as feisty as an over- caffeinated terrier during rainy times and lie around in sandy pajamas the rest of the year. Horton Creek is no part-timer. It goes non-stop, tumbling in a furious rush through a rich forest at the base of the Mogollon Rim. Needless to say, that combo makes for a spectacular day of hiking.
 
The trail starts at the Upper Tonto Creek Campground, following an old wagon road. It parallels the stream, yet is slightly removed from it. While this is a fine, shady ramble beneath Ponderosa pine, Douglas fir, and an understory of juniper, oak and maple, the water beckons. A trace trail hugs the creek bank with filament pathways connecting the two.
 
When a seductive cascade calls you down to the water, you can clamber along the creek-side path. When you want slightly easier travel — not winding among rocks and downed logs — return to the wagon trail. The wagon road and trace trail stay in pretty close contact until the last half-mile. The wagon road gets steeper, crossing a rock-strewn segment, then launches into a few sharp switchbacks to a junction with the Highline Trail. This is today's stopping point. But first follow the sign pointing to the right to check out Horton Spring, the source of this picturesque little creek. Water gushes from the hillside, spilling over moss-covered boulders.
 
This is a wonderfully refreshing summer hike, and a favorite in autumn as well when things get gaudy up in here." ~ Roger Naylor - "Boots & Burgers: An Arizona Handbook For Hungry Hikers"
 
 
Trail To The Wind Cave
 
The Usery Mountains rise along the Eastern edge of the Phoenix metropolitan area, the beginning of a mountainous band that includes the Goldfields and the mighty Superstitions. At the geological heart of Usery Mountain Regional Park stands Pass Mountain. Craggy strata of volcanic rock earned the mountain its nickname “Scarface”. High up that rocky cliff you’ll find and unlikely little sanctuary known as the wind cave. The trail rambles through a pretty patch of desert, rising only slightly at first. I’m surrounded by a gallery of desert denizens so profuse I expect to find a grounds keeping crew nooning in the shade of palo verde tree. Strategically scattered boulders add a nice bit of texture to the usual suspects of saguaros, chollas, barrels, ocotillos, and creosote. The only slight distraction is a muffled popping sound. Folds are firing off a few rounds at Usery Mountain Shooting Range. But it’s far enough away so it just sounds like I’ve got some Orville Redenbackher in the microwave. Great. Now I’m craving popcorn.
 
Once the trail reaches the base of the mountain, it begins climbing in earnest, a steady grade of rocky switchbacks but never grueling. It is exposed the entire way with the sun just leaning on you. The desert can unleash a withering, angry heat, a heat that blowtorches the rocks and sand. It is a heat that will make you weep just so it can harvest your tears. So it is a great pleasure to reach your destination and slip out of the sun.
 
The cave is actually a scooped out alcove atop a ledge of lichen-covered volcanic tuff. It is a long swath of shade – lush sponge cake – like shade – with a cool breeze funneled through. The drop in temperature can be remarkable. Seeping water feeds bunches of rock daisies growing from the walls and ceiling. Bees swarm about, busy like always, but they pay me no mind. It’s a sweet spot to relax and enjoy broad vistas across the valley floor. Some adventurous types like to continue past the cave, climbing a rugged and unmaintained pathway to the top of Pass Mountain. You go ahead. I’ll snooze here in the cool shade." ~ Source: Roger Naylor "Boots & Burgers: An Arizona Handbook For Hungry Hikers"
 
 
Boyce Thompson Arboretum
 
"Boyce Thompson Arboretum is Arizona’s oldest and largest botanical garden. The 350-acre park was created to study drought-tolerant plants from around the world. Trails meander through diverse habitats such as herb gardens, cactus gardens, palm groves, and forest of shaggy-barked eucalyptus trees. Every few steps you’ll stop to ponder how a collection of arid-friendly flora can appear so enchantingly lush. BTA is located on U.S. 60 at Milepost 223, about an hour’s drive East of Phoenix." ~ Source: Roger Naylor "Boots & Burgers: An Arizona Handbook For Hungry Hikers".
 
 
Mill Avenue Bridge Reflections
 
"Illuminated bridges create a colorful nighttime display as an array of lights skitters off the surface." ~ Roger Naylor "Boots & Burgers: An Arizona Handbook For Hungry Hikers".
 
Photographed at Tempe Town Lake, in Tempe Arizona, of the Mill Avenue bridge crossing the lake before entering downtown Tempe.
 
 
Lightning Mirth
 
"Mirth is like a flash of lightning, that breaks through a gloom of clouds, and glitters for a moment; cheerfulness keeps up a kind of daylight in the mind, and fills it with a steady and perpetual serenity." ~ Joseph Addison
 
Photographed from McFadden peak, which is another place that is in my "backyard" on the edge of the Sierra Ancha Wilderness, in the Tonto National Forest. If the lightning strike was not there, you would see the outline of Four Peaks mountain range in its place...the thrust of this storm was centered right over my land, and while trying to ride the storm out, I gave up when the hail started, and escaped 5 miles north to this peak where I could watch the storm above. When I returned to my land the storm was over, and the other locals in the area told me that was the worst in 2 years. And while falling asleep to the sound of running flood washes nearby and the drip of rain on the tent from the Oak and Pine trees above, I was in perpetual serenity.

 

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Comments

jeanne stone(non-registered)
Your photos are great and how exciting t o have some of them published!Also am loving your blog! IT is perfect and love how your photos stream on your website. So proud of you and your work and brag about you all of the time!
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